Category: Film Reviews

Bohemian Rhapsody is Honest to Freddie Mercury’s Identities but Glosses Over His Tragedies

Bohemian Rhapsody is Honest to Freddie Mercury’s Identities but Glosses Over His Tragedies

I bought a ticket to see 2018’s Bohemian Rhapsody somewhat apprehensively. Though I was originally elated at the prospect of a Queen biopic, I’d heard rumors that the film denied any mention of frontman Freddie Mercury’s sexuality or his Parsi ethnicity. These assertions were so widespread that back in June I’d witnessed a woman at WeHo Pride yell at a street team promoting the film.

The Irresistible Queerbaiting of “A Simple Favor”

The Irresistible Queerbaiting of “A Simple Favor”

After learning about the movie online and hearing that the two main characters Kendrick and Lively kiss, I was worried that the writers and the director were queer baiting their potential audience. I was also concerned that they were going to play into the lesbian villain trope, where a queer woman appears to be unstable and only there to antagonize.

The Lasting Relevance of “Get On The Bus”

The Lasting Relevance of “Get On The Bus”

Spike Lee’s Get on the Bus premiered on October 16, 1996, a date that commemorated the one-year anniversary of the Million Man March. The film is Lee’s love song to the spirit of the day that an estimated 837,000 black men descended on the Nation’s Capitol.

Review: Jewel’s Catch One

Review: Jewel’s Catch One

Jewel Thais-Williams is a force to be reckoned with. C. Fitz the, director of Jewel’s Catch One, introduces her with such subtlety that you may mistake Thais-Williams as just one of the thousands of patrons who frequented Catch One during its 42-year run.

Review: Signature Move

Review: Signature Move

The film (written by Fawzia Mirza and directed by Jennifer Reeder) is set in Chicago and follows Zayna (Fawzia Mirza), an American-Pakistani lawyer. She finds herself in a relationship with a free-spirited Mexican-American bookstore owner named Alma (Sari Sanchez). While Alma’s family is supportive of Alma’s identities and relationships, Zayna’s mother obsesses with finding her semi-closeted daughter a husband.

Review: Whitney

Review: Whitney

Whitney, a documentary about Whitney Houston helmed by Kevin Macdonald that made the rounds at prominent festivals at the end of 2017 and early 2018, finally hit theaters this summer. It is a wrenching gut punch as personal footage and photos of Houston and her family are shown.  Houston hailed from a modest but very successful musical family. When her musical abilities started to show as a child, her mother, gospel singer Cissy Houston, honed Whitney’s skills in church and later, on stage as Cissy’s own backup singer.

Review: Game Girls

Review: Game Girls

By Jasmine Lowe Game Girls is the second documentary by Polish director, Alina Skrzeszewska. The story starts out by chronicling the lives of a Black lesbian couple living in Downtown Los Angeles’ Skid Row neighborhood. We are introduced to Teri Rogers, who is seen managing her mental illness by attending a women’s group, and Tiahna…

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Review: Wild Nights With Emily

Review: Wild Nights With Emily

By Laura Leger My entire life I have been fed information – what I now know has been a lie – that Emily Dickinson was a stoic shut-in obsessed with death and all things depressing. I never knew I needed a movie with Molly Shannon as a super gay Emily Dickinson living her best, secret…

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Review: “A Long Road to Freedom: The Advocate Celebrates 50 Years”

Review: “A Long Road to Freedom: The Advocate Celebrates 50 Years”

A Long Road To Freedom: The Advocate Celebrates 50 Years is a moving documentary directed by William Clift that gives the audience firsthand accounts and never-before-seen archival footage and imagery of watershed moments in LGBTQ history. The film covers everything from the Black Cat Riots, Stonewall, the disco sexual revolution, the AIDS crisis, marriage equality, and…

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A Review: “The Miseducation of Cameron Post”

A Review: “The Miseducation of Cameron Post”

By Laura Leger Director Desiree Akhavan’s film “The Miseducation of Cameron Post” is a touching coming of age film based on the 2012 novel by Emily Danforth. Set in the early 90’s, the movie centers around teenager Cameron Post (Chloë Grace Moretz) who is sent to a Christian gay conversion therapy camp after being caught…

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